Wednesday, June 1, 2011

Litter Mob 2


Litter over exposure? This is the last of it until...next week! But we did see some pretty things, too, that day, and I wanted to hold off showing it all until The Times story had run.

Tulip trees. I have never been in the park when they drop, and last week there was a crocheted carpet of them as we walked. I had not see one since I was a little girl in Bloemfontein, where the Josephs, who lived across the street from us, had a huge tulip tree shading their driveway. Mrs Joseph taught my mother to make dolmades. Tulip trees = dolmades. Anyone got any grape leaves?

I had also never seen coral fungi (second picture), which turned out to be edible, when I looked it up (can't tell genus or species) No, I left them there. This litter has put a serious dampener on my foraging...


The enormous dryad's saddle (Polyporus squamosus, and apparently quite good to eat when  young), a bracket fungi, was growing on a fallen tree. Exactly like a saddle, once they are this large and perhaps at night the dryads emerge from the trees and ride off into the stars above Brooklyn. Perhaps one day the mosaic above will be all flowers and fruit and fungi.

4 comments:

  1. If we asked parks to remove the logs so there would be less cruising 'stations,' shroomers would then rise up and complain!

    It does seem that shrooming and cruising have a common denominator -the fallen tree.

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  2. what a nice article, and now i know how to pronounce your name! and that you must not be squeamish about anything, if not refuse in a park.

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  3. What did you discover about the effectiveness of brush around the base of the tree to cut down on the coupling/root trampling?

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  4. Frank - as a (more-squeamish-by the- minute) shroomer, I would have to agree.

    Donna - I'm plenty squeamish. I promise.

    Paul - well. Around the tulip trees it was still mostly in place. But there is no actual plan plan to 'brush' around the trees. I'd like to change that. It works so well for erosion control in hiking areas where people have created short cuts. And it's good for critters, too.

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