Friday, July 15, 2011

A mechanic's garden

Garden in July

I have watched some interesting edible plant activity on a corner lot on Pacific Street for a couple of years now. At first it was the herbs I noticed: summer savoury, of all things, and mint, growing beside the rusty chainlink fence, squeezed between parked cars in the gravel lot and the concrete sidewalk. Tomatoes and peppers appeared. Then one year nothing.

Garden in May

This spring the rear of the lot suddenly (it seemed to me) filled with containers in a declaration of gardening: paint buckets, a bath, cans, each planted with vegetable. I took pictures and muttered here about wanting to know more.

Trevor Jacks' scaffold garden

One day I saw a man looking with the kind of appraisal at this garden that only a person who tends it every day could. I started talking to him, explained my interest in his garden and asked whether I may interview him. The look he gave me was the one I might direct upon a tobacco hornworm eating my perfect tomatoes, but I held my ground. I have become braver. Recently,  on a break from his work at Heights Auto Body, he condescended to answer my questions as briefly as possible, with vague amusement at my persistent interest, in an accent whose music was almost as good as holiday in the islands.

You can read Trevor Jack's interview over at ShelterPop.


  1. I love this interview. Sounds like it would if you talked to my mechanic. :)

  2. What a delightful fellow and interview. I think "gardeners" are often seen as the 'white gloved lady" set who garden because they have lots of time on their hands. All of us know that is not us!

    It's nice to meet a "real" man who farms! and for whom it is a part of life. You summed it up... we need to teach children to grow things!

    And, I am glad you have kept up with his garden of plastic pots.

  3. Cristy - thanks!

    webb - thank you - that was Trevor's advice, about teaching kids to garden :-)


Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...