Tuesday, January 22, 2013

The fallen


The great Christmas tree discard continues.

We still have ours.

I like it. The cat likes it. It sheds needles into his water bowl. I sweep needles up every morning. He sleeps in front of it every night.

Our first Christmas tree. We'll miss it.

A bonfire would be nice...of all the thrown away trees. A new slogan: Bonfires, not guns.

12.09pm, from the wires: I have it on good authority that the Parks Department chipper is at work on Park Avenue, chipping the trees the city erected on the long lovely mall in the middle of Park Avenue. I love the smell of wood chips in the morning?

11 comments:

  1. It's good that the tree is organic, it's easy to get rid of it.

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  2. Here, the "city" brings in a big truck with shredder to one of the local parks. Instant mulch. I'm lucky enough to have wild back yard with a brush heap. If I'd had a tree, it would have landed there.

    To brag a bit more -- I have a fire pit, too.

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    Replies
    1. Diane - Please make a bonfire for us. With marshmallows?

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  3. This has been my first winter Christmas, and seeing the trees discarded on the street was quite upsetting. I don't know if they are from sustainable plantations (Dewberry mentions organic trees) or perhaps just "common" in Europe and North America. Whether common or not, it bothers me how disposable they seem to be. There are way too many things people just throw away, And where is "away" anyway?
    Korien

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    Replies
    1. Korien I think Dewberry means organic in its original sense, as in once-living, and biodegradable. Not grown organically...

      These trees all come from plantations...They used to be turned into mulch for city parks and gardens, by the city, and still should be. I thinknow they land up on dumps unless taken in person to the few places that do create mulch - here in Brooklyn the Green-Wood Cemetery recycles trees.

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  4. When I was growing up my father lugged it to the back of the property for a winter shelter for small animals, with my mother cutting a few boughs to add to her flower beds for winter cover. So smart.

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  5. I take a load of green waste to my tip once a week (palms drop continuously!) and after Christmas saw quite a few conifer branches. I think the Council uses the resultant chippings on municipal gardens. So...wood chips with stinkhorns!

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  6. This was our first Christmas tree in NYC as well. It was amusing to see how they're disposed of here. In California, we simply leave them at the curb and they disappear with the yard waste. Here the chipper seemed to draw a crowd to Cobble Hill park. It also left the scent of evergreens at the corner of Verandah and Clinton. Each night when I walk the dog now, I walk through a faint cloud of evergreen. A ghost of Christmas past. Nice to have that reminder deep into January.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Russ - wait: there was a chipper in Cobble Hill Park? How did I miss that?

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  7. Marie - Yes! The first two weekends of the new year, there was a municipal chipper parked at Clinton and Verandah on Saturday (and Sunday the second weekend). Folks brought their trees, kids watched the chipping and people could leave with a bag of evergreen mulch. It was quaint and reminded me how Brooklyn is often like a very small town.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Russ. In that case, I am a complete idiot. I had no idea. And I live about 100 yards away.

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