Wednesday, October 4, 2017

A late African spring


Sparaxis elegans, an indigenous spring flower, is blooming in drifts near my parents' house in the greenbelt - a green and public right of way - that shoulders their property. For the most part, exotic and invasive plants are making life difficult for the native flora that should thrive, here, but the sparaxis plants are toughing it out, dogs and foot traffic notwithstanding. The tree is the background is a pear in blossom, a possible relic of old farmland.


The Frenchman and I went for a walk here soon after landing. I spent my days in this pretty green place in my early teenage-hood, stalking tadpoles and watercress, walking with our own dogs, sometimes followed by a cat (Garfunkle, black and white, who often shouted for me to slow down).


It is late spring in Cape Town. The equivalent of early May in New York City. Leaves are new, grasses are beginning to flower.



We met a group of American tourists being guided along the path. We saw two Cape chameleons having a fight, and a third on the tree where we often see many. Small girls rode horses, and our own corgis overtook us even though we had not invited them along: they went out walking with my dad, who sits on a bench here for a long time and looks at things. He was surprised but happy to see us. He forgets most newly acquired facts. The surprises of vascular dementia.


Roses ramble up the outside of the living wall that hedges my parents' garden. They were planted decades ago and fend for themselves.


My friend Don identified this tree - Diospyros whyteana, a South African species of persimmon, commonly called bladder nut. I had never seen it in bloom, before. My mom has three in front of the house, looser limbed, and I still did not recognize it.


And higher up, where very few humans and dogs walk, statuesque Wachendorfia thyrsiflora. 

Soon, we leave on a little roadtrip, following the south coast to the Eastern Cape, and then straight up north through the Karoo and into the Northern Cape, before doubling back to Cape Town.

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6 comments:

  1. Respite from book deadlines and insanity in the U.S.
    Well earned.
    Enjoy, Marie!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Glad you arrived safely. Enjoy your time with your parents.

    ReplyDelete
  3. A breath of spring air, badly needed here in the states.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Well, I've finally done it.
    I've read your entire blog from
    start til now. (As promised )
    when I first discovered you a
    few months ago.
    Thank you for a wonderful adventure.
    I will continue to follow.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Enjoy your time in a very special part of the world, the Eastern Cape!

    ReplyDelete

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