Monday, August 21, 2017

Hot roots



I grew horseradish for the first time, this year. It arrived from Johnny's Seeds (in the company of several seed packets whose contents failed to germinate altogether - I don't think it was Johnny's fault, but it was frustrating) in March. I planted it in long holes, dug at an angle. It took months to show signs of life.


But all five roots sprouted, and there they are, looking uncannily like yellow dock (Rumex crispus). I think we will be able to harvest some, conservatively, late in the year. Or perhaps I should save them, for next early spring, which is when the fat, rude rude roots start showing up in local stores for Passover. I can't help blushing when I pick one up (each one has two balls, plus, er...you you know). You harvest them by cutting of the large root and saving the side roots for replanting. Left too long they become gnarly and fibrous. All this is theoretical knowledge, for me, clearly.

Freshly grated horseradish is one of our favourite condiments, eaten raw, its sting going straight up the nose, rather than down the throat.


5 comments:

  1. I hope you will post when you dig and use the horseradish. My friend gave me a root years ago and I have a nice patch going now. Haven't dug any yet.

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    Replies
    1. I shall! Go on, dig some of yours. Apparently they get too tough if left for a long time :-)

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  2. I started one this year, too. Dad used to make the BEST horseradish and we have missed it, so am trying to start my own. Can't wait to see how it goes. (He used an old fashioned meat grinder - hand turned - to grind the root. Said he burned out too many blenders trying to do it!)

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    Replies
    1. Interesting - it sounds as though he really made a lot! I wish I had my mother's old meat grinder. The thing is a hand cranked beast, and perfect for many things. Do you still have his?

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