Thursday, November 12, 2020

Just leave (s)...

The leaves all fell overnight. I had a funny feeling they might. But I have never noticed this phenomenon, before. Is that what they do, after an initial, exploratory flutter? 

Look at those oak leaves, up there. I wear a size 11 boot (if I didn't, the nearly six feet of me would fall over). Those are 14-inch leaves.

I may be walking more than before, too. Every day. So you see every little, interesting change. Your neighborhood is overflowing with surprises. The more you see, the more often you see, the more you...well, see.

If we thought the week before the votes were counted was bad. If we thought the last four years were bad. How about these days? 

So we walk.

These - above - are cherry leaves. The native Prunus serotina.

Ginkgo biloba. Ancient tree of the dinosaurs.


Japanese cutleaf maple. Acer palmatum var. dissectum, and probably a cultivar called 'Something' in single, inverted commas, as cultivars are. Cutleaf maple was one of the first trees whose botanical I name I learned, long ago, working at a Manhattan nursery while I recovered from whooping cough. It is a knee-jerk nursery staple. The trees at Green-Wood are mature and gorgeous, and have won me over. 


Sweetgum leaves. Liquidamber styraciflua. Native to North America.

                            Magnolia leaves. But I don't know what kind.

And more oak. Quercus. Pointy tips, so in the red oak group (white oaks have rounded lobes). Dozens of oaks are native to North America and I still have a lot to learn about them.

I am planning  a picnic menu for a very rare forage walk this Saturday. It's the first picnic since March. And before we are locked down again. We will walk in shoreline dunes with fresh breezes. The walk sold out in hours. Everyone wants out.

It looks like this:

Quails eggs with fresh field garlic salt

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Persimmon and mugwort focaccia

Field garlic goat cheese spread 

Beach plum and autumn olive drizzles

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Ginkgo sticks

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Roasted carrot hand pies with pine honey, juniper, elderflower vinegar, and sweet white clover

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Pine honey madeleines

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8 comments:

  1. What a beautifully thoughtful post...thank you, Marie!

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  2. Oh, the gorgeous photos and the picnic menu!

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  3. I was looking at black pine trees. My husband suggested I try the jam first. I ordered some Siberian pine cone jam on eBay.If I like it, I may but=y a bunch of dwarf Japanese black pine trees.

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  4. I was looking at black pine trees. My husband suggested I try the jam first. I ordered some Siberian pine cone jam on eBay.If I like it, I may but=y a bunch of dwarf Japanese black pine trees.

    ReplyDelete
  5. No its not what they do. They shed slowly. Ive noticed the same.

    ReplyDelete

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